Creativity Leads to Self Sufficiency

Every article I write is aimed at this realization.

By suggesting that “traditional skills” are indeed important to cultivate in our modern day, I hope to inspire others, especially the less inclined to be creative type people, to learn a craft. If every person would just experiment and find a craft or skill that they could develop a talent for, then every person would be able to feel that they had something to offer to the world.

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The “end of the world” proclamations and jokes are ever abounding. More and more people are seeking out how to live outside of a city, how to grow gardens, how to make food from scratch, and essentially to adapt into a lifestyle of homesteading or “prepping”. None of these are unworthy goals. All are indeed wonderful and essential skills and goals to have. The threats and the “what-ifs” are always there and even seem to be increasing as time passes.

Computer Sciences are also a very real skill that is required in this modern day. It is nothing to sneeze at. But imagine, we lost the ability to use our modern technologies? Having a trade-skill in that scenario would be priceless. The great thing is that while we have it…we should use it! Learning and gaining knowledge has never been easier. The internet is a valuable tool for those that seek to be educated.

Will it ever happen? That’s in God’s hands.  If I (and suggestively “you”) don’t take the steps to cultivate some of these skills into my (our) everyday living and teach them to friends, neighbors, children, and grandchildren, then the traditional skills that our ancestors built this nation on, will die out. In the event of an “end of the world” scenario, too many will not know how to build it back up again. We have forgotten how to be creators, how to imagine something and then have the skill set to be able to build it.

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Our best friend’s recently built their own home from the ground up. It is the cutest little dry cabin in the woods ever! My husband and I helped a bit with the construction, and all of us learned what it takes to build a home as it was constructed piece by piece. We had the worst winter in years, and that little hand-built, owner engineered house withstood it all and kept a family of seven warm and cozy. I have to say we are all feeling pretty good about that, and it proved that we really can do things ourselves. 

 

Be a Butterfly.

Heidi

P.S. I was lucky enough to chat with writer and Youtube hostess Esther Emery of Fouch-O-matic Off Grid on her homestead wife channel about how yarn and fiber arts are relative to homesteading, preparedness and survival. Watch it below or go here!

A Re-fashion for Spring

All winter long I had on my yarn-crafting list to make myself a new wool hat. At one point, hoping to encourage myself in that endeavor, I even threw out all of my old acyrlic hats. Even my most favorite that often got compliments.

Most of the kids got a wool hat, and my husband a month ago was awarded his that was made from Handspun pygora/alpaca yarn that I processed and spun myself. (I will have to snap a picture when he is home)

Alas, spring has arrived and I never did make one for myself. With just a slight detour to my original ambitions, I picked up a crochet hook and whipped out this cute spring hat just in time for my birthday:

What’s even more exciting is that I made it with yarn that I reclaimed from a thifted cotton sweater! It is actually two different yarns, one purple and one blue, and I re-spun them  with my spinning wheel and then plied them together. This created a really unique colored yarn. It is marled, yet from a distance the finished fabric appears to be a solid color.

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The blue reclaimed yarn in this project is the same that was used in the needlepoint lace project and the edging on the crochet towel. The difference being, that the yarn for the needlepoint project and towel edging, was from the short pieces and this worsted re-spun cotton was made from the long continuous lengths from the body of these sweaters.

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The accent yarn for this hat is reclaimed sari silk that I bought from Darn Good Yarn. It made a great piece of fabric for stabilizing the brim of this hat. It was not a part of the original pattern, but it was too floppy to hold the shape I desired, so I duplicated the brim section of the pattern and then sewed it to the underside. The reclaimed silk yarn really jazzed up this newsboy styled cap!

For a little extra flare and accent I picked out some thrifted vintage buttons, and created a cute little flower.

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This was a fun project to make, and it was exciting to be able to use all recycled/reclaimed materials to create something new and unique. I can put on this hat and know that no one has the same one.

Recyling and reclaiming the material that is available to us is a great way to be wise stewards over those things. A disliked sweater doesn’t need to be trash, it can become beautiful yarn for a fun springtime hat, trim in a towel, lace edging on a pocket, the options are limitless.

Be a Butterfly

Heidi